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Angie_AllAditherBlogI've said it before. And here I am saying it again: One of my very favorite elements of blogging is encountering new and interesting people and having new and interesting conversations. Enter self-proclaimed "writer, mom, graphic designer and lawyer's wife" Angie of the wonderful, "honest and earnest site" All Adither. In her endearing bio, Angie states, "I am egregiously tall, have a son with severe food allergies and love cookies with beer. I alternately struggle with existential angst and the fit of my jeans." Now, I am more of a cupcakes with Pinot Grigio girl myself, but I am thrilled that this egregiously tall and talented creature agreed to grace ILI and answer some of my questions. Thank you, Angie! As a writer AND blogger, what do you think is the biggest different between writing prose and writing posts?

Angie: I think in writing posts you have to be more aware that another website is just a click away. People have less patience with internet content than with a magazine or book they've purchased or invested time to get from the library. It's more crucial, I think, to grab the reader instantly. When I'm blogging, I try to write as if I'm talking to my friend.

That said, in my personal blog, I tend to let myself get artsy and play with turning phrases, etc. Though I generally try to keep my posts quite short and attach one of my photos that loosely relates to the content. It's my place to experiment. On sites I'm hired to write for, as well as on my cooking site I'm much more strict with myself.

You're married to an attorney. Several years ago, I stopped practicing law to become a full-time writer. It seems like the writer-attorney bond has many incarnations! How does the "lawyer's wife" perspective affect your writing?

Angie: I don't know if it's being a lawyer's wife per se, but being a wife in general has given me tons of material. The dynamic between a husband and wife, the richness, the tension, the arguments, the flirtation with longing, a little bit, for single life again all tremendously add to my writing.

Lawyers do tend to work long hours, so there's that too. The resentment and sympathy toward your spouse who is, physically and emotionally away a lot of the time puts a certain spin on everything I write.

Love is something that comes up a lot here on Ivy League Insecurities and I noticed that you recently posted about celebrating your eighth wedding anniversary. What is one thing you wish you could tell every newlywed about making it to eight years (and beyond)?

Angie: When I look at my parents, who've been married forty-two years and my husband's parents, who were married more than fifty years, eight doesn't seem so lofty. And I fumble through it all just like everyone else. I guess I would say to choose your spouse wisely. Go for character over personality. And try to pick someone with a similar temperament. If you're super social, don't go for a hermit. You won't be happy. Also, be open hearted. It's so hard to live with someone, have kids with someone and handle daily stresses all while trying to compromise with another person, if you have compassion for your spouse, and a sense of humor, it'll make it go more smoothly.

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Thank you, Angie, for your candid and thought-provoking answers! Cheers to the eternal struggle with jean fit and existential angst. Cheers to good blogs, good marriages, and honest words.

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Do you have a different set of standards when choosing blogs and books to read? Do you agree that a blog must grab the reader's interest more instantly?

Do you agree that there is immense material inherent in the husband-wife relationship? (I do!) If married, do you experience the longing for single life to which Angie alludes? How do you cope with this longing, however minor it might be?

Do you agree with Angie's counsel to go for character over personality when selecting a spouse. Do you agree that it is advisable to pick someone with a similar temperament?

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