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Welcome to my little corner of the ether. This is where you will find information about my books and musings on life and love in New York City. To stay in the loop about all things ADR...

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Yesterday was a bruiser. I took my big girls to two birthday parties downtown. There were a lot of logistics to consider, presents and costumes to tote, and sugar to consume. I knew that by evening, my kids and I would be spent. And we were. We went to my mother's briefly to say hello and so the girls could play with their cousin. I was tired, but felt good. At home, the girls were quick to bed and my husband and I were quick to the couch. He turned on the Giants game and I snuggled up next to him, nodding off on his shoulder. I awoke at various points of the game, the highlights I'd like to think. When the game was over, I realized that I was not feeling good. When I stood, I was dizzy and ran for the bathroom. I spent the rest of the night between my bed and the bowl.

The stomach flu. I can't remember the last time I had it, but this was a wicked bout. I spent a chunk of the night curled up on the cold tile by the toilet and by morning I felt utterly emptied and impossibly week. What's interesting is that while I was getting sick, I thought of the times in college when I'd get sick from drinking too much. For some odd reason, it was usually on a Sunday morning when this would happen. I would race to the toilet in my little dingy bathroom of my off-campus apartment and vomit up white wine. It was disgusting and I remember thinking the whole thing was an utterly appropriate collegiate happening and also quite funny.

I haven't gotten sick from drinking in ages. It seems my body reacts differently now and when I go too far my body just shuts down. I usually pass out, and sometimes I do not remember parts of the night. This embarrasses me to write this, to admit this, but maybe that's a good thing. Maybe that's a reason. I don't want these things to happen anymore.

Anyway. Today is a lost cause. I have no strength, or appetite. Thankfully, no one else seems to be sick. Yet.

Vulnerability Is a Good Thing

Not the Plan